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Keep Your Portfolio Up-to-Date At All Times

I have a never-expiring calendar reminder for myself to update my portfolio. Otherwise I just won’t do it.

Make Yourself Do It

 

But it is surprisingly hard to make yourself do it even with a calendar reminder constantly dinging you. And unfortunately you only ever realize that you needed to do it – and didn’t – when you need your resume to be up to date when you are ready (or worse: when you aren’t ready) to move to the next gig.

resu1This added pressure means that you are now going to be under the gun to send out your resume in a not quite up to date form, or you will struggle to remember all the cool new things you have done in the past many months.

It won’t be your best showing. You won’t likely have all the detail you once had. And ultimately you are doing a disservice to yourself when thinking about this late in the game.

Use LinkedIn As Your Source of Truth

A long time ago I stopped maintaining a resume in document form.

Before there was a LinkedIn it made sense to constantly toil over the formatting of my resume. And it made since to keep a copy and several backups.

I needed a consistent place to go to for the source of truth for my work history as there wasn’t one clear winner on the internet for such things.  Back then I would keep a digital resume on Monster and various other job boards. It was a real hassle to keep them all up to date.

But now a days it is easy to keep your information in LinkedIn. It is now my source of truth.

I try to go there at least once a month to enter at least one cool thing I did that month. It might be something simple like solving a customer’s problem. Or something more complex like learning a new thing in a pinch prior to a sales call or speaking engagement.

sour1Similar to blogging, if you don’t pay attention to the every day details of your day job you will miss the really important parts that you can use later to sell yourself.

Additionally you are missing the opportunity of someone looking for that special talent that you just picked up. You may make good money doing a bang-up job with that 80% thing you do. You run up against some new fancy way of doing things. And that becomes your new norm.

But you never update your resume.

As far as recruiters and other hiring managers know you are only really good at that 80% thing. There is no mention of your new go-to-favorite skill – which is what they really need right now and can’t find anywhere.

This is a missed opportunity for you in a couple of ways. The recruiter won’t contact you to let you know that your new skill is in high demand. Which means you miss out on the possibility of shifting to a new gig. Or, if you really like your job, but want to earn more, you might miss the opportunity to bargain around your newly found skill. Either way, this is your loss in the here and now.

So what sorts of things might you keep track of on LinkedIn? When you have a job, you can use LinkedIn as a running log of interesting facts. When you don’t have a job you can scour through your profile and clean out the things that aren’t really relevant any more. Let’s look at what sorts of things are hand to keep track of:

Title and Responsibility Changes

There are a couple ways of tracking when your title changes and when your responsibility changes. The first is the easiest and doesn’t require much thought. Keep one entry per company you work at. Update the title. List the existing responsibilities.

promo1This is a great way to keep a short resume. And it is a great way to not tell your hiring manager about your history. This is where the difference between a traditional resume and a CV/Portfolio come in. When I am in the hiring manager role I like to see where a person has been and all the things at a high level they have done while at a company.

If you were a developer, then a team lead, then the architect, then the engineering director – list those out. They are very different jobs. They will have very different responsibilities. And being able to show that you have done them all is important to many hiring managers. It shows you are experienced.

We have interns at my current company. One of which we have had back three separate times. For a person like this it is very important to distinctly show that you came back at three different times. And detail out what you did on each occasion. This paints a different picture than someone who just worked somewhere with no timeline. It doesn’t show that we liked you so much that we kept hiring your back.

Business Goals Achieved

Business people, hiring managers, etc. – they don’t generally care that you learned the latest version of HTML. What they do care is that because of your mastery of this new version of HTML you were able to up the sales conversion of your check out process because more customers are able to complete the check out process on their phone and tablets.

roi1Geeks really care that you were able to write a mail sending tool in 100 lines of unreadable code. But business folks care that your tool took into account the bounce rate of certain domains and the rules around how you stay off of black lists so that your email penetration goes up 30% which effectively increased their over all penetration resulting in X number of new dollars for the month.

Now, don’t get me wrong. You need to swizzle this in a manner that you salt and pepper your business swizzle with some tech babble so that all audiences are made happy. If you just deliver the business numbers uber geeks may find your resume wanting. Add appropriate tech talk to sell that you know what you are talking about.

Use the Right Voice to Tell the Right Story

Equally important to what you did is how you tell the story. It is very off-putting to read about a guy that is singing the me-me-me-me-me-me-meeeee song! It is ok for you to say “I used tech X to achieve business Y” now and then. But equally important is how you enabled the team to achieve a goal. Or how you pulled bugs for a week to get to zero defects (sacrificed your enjoyment for the team). Tell a story of being a valuable team member.

If you are in a leadership role tell the story of how you are a shit-umbrella vs. a shit-funnel.  Give concrete examples of how you help you team get stuff done.

Bottom line: keep your portfolio up-to-date at all times. And LinkedIn is a great place to use for it.

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Becoming a Programming Expert Is Within Your Reach

I have always really enjoyed building things.

I had a dad who built all sorts of things out of wood. That was his medium when not working on his day job. He built gazebos and greenhouses and decks. He also put things together without instructions.

He got places without asking for directions (before GPS). He would charge off into the woods in search of a stream to fish. He would get into his airplane, take off, get to where he was going, land. All of this was done effortlessly.  He has always acted as though he knew how to do things. He was an expert at everything!

Two Kinds of Expert

Jeweler using a blowtorch while he works on a ring
Jeweler using a blowtorch while he works on a ring

As a dad myself I now know that from time to time he was either “winging it” or had toiled enough at a task way ahead of time to make the task now seem effortless. And much of his success in the now was based on previous successes and failures of past experiences. But ultimately he had told himself that he would figure it out. He had faith in himself to solider on and get through it. But from my point of view looking from the outside in he was an expert at everything he did. I was always amazed.

Over night success is achieved through years of hard work and practice.

To be honest I think there are really two forms of perceived expert in the world. There is the guy that is a deep dive technical genius in their world. They have seen everything. They have done everything. There is no stone unturned. They have forgotten more then you will ever learn. They can answer any question asked.

Then there is the person that isn’t afraid to say “I don’t know.”

They have seen some things. They have gotten their hands dirty from time to time. They have failed at least as much as they have succeeded. They know someone with the right answer, or they can produce the answer through searching and reading. They can eventually answer any question asked.

Different Types of Expert Produce Different Results

Now let’s talk about how valuable these two folks are to me, you, our industry, and our society.

madscThe first person may eventually solve cancer. Or cure world hunger. Or resolve global warming. That would be valuable. But perhaps they learned game changing things along the way to solving one of these world issues – but didn’t actually solve anything? And they didn’t share any of their findings while on their journey. Then died. Their activities unrecorded. Their knowledge lost. Not very valuable.

Take the other person. They have been here and there but not everywhere.  They have done some things. While learning they are also actively sharing their findings. Over time they amass a great deal of knowledge – almost comparable to the guy that knows everything.

Also, as they are putting who they are and where they are out in front of the world for all to see – they are continuously being pushed to be better. They correct any wrong assumptions they have made along the way. They are not working in a vacuum.  Instead they get feedback every step of the way.

Perhaps they solve one of those world issues. Perhaps they don’t. Perhaps instead they contribute to someone else who can tackle the world issue.  But in my mind the guy that is more valuable is the one that gave to the community without seeking anything in return. The person that contributed to the story potentially for someone else in their industry learn from.

Becoming An Expert

As a kid I was inspired by my father to tackle problems head on. Get shit done. No one could stop me but me.

html3As a result of that whatever I was interested in at the time, I was pushing in new ways. Learning all that I could. Never enough to be a truly deep technical expert to the experts of the world, but always enough to be more expert than the majority of the next guys.

One day a customer at Fry’s (while I worked as a technical representative for HP at Fry’s) showed me HTML. It was a very low bar but amazing. He opened notepad and just started hammering out some characters.  With each iteration he would flip to a browser and show me a web page. Back to code. Back to a web page. He was building something out of nothing. How cool was that!? I have no idea if that guy was an expert or not, but to me he was the only person I knew that could type out all sorts of gibberish and make something structured and usable.

Every expert was once a beginner.

I have seen people that knew nothing about a topic quickly come up to speed on something and immediately grab the title of expert.  Being an expert can at times be a context-oriented label.  You can be an expert at something in your peer group. You can be an expert at something in your office. You can be an expert at something in the city you are in. Or you can be an expert at something in your industry. Those are all levels of expert.

Then you can further slice those definitions of expert by vertical slices in our world of technology. You may be an expert at building distributed systems using C# and NServiceBus on MSMQ. You are the expert in this space. However, in a room of Java programmers, you might be reduced to being an expert at the theory of distributed systems but a total n00b at the any of the technology tools they may use.

Apply this to any band of people. People live in groups. Programmers have peer groups, coworkers, city of residence, city where they work, regional groupings, industry groupings, industry sub-groupings, and global groupings.

And programmers have a huge variety of technical options across all of those people groupings. This means there is a very low bar for you to become an expert at certain things in certain circles.  Being an expert at something, which will ultimately help you achieve your career goals, is mathematically accessible to anyone who is willing to put in the work.

All the so-called ‘secrets of success’ will not work unless you do.

So then how do you become expert enough in your area of interest? START!

There is no reason to not be thought of as an expert by someone in a meaningful way. There are so many sites on the internet dedicated to people posting their questions in a given subject matter. For programmers that site might be as simple as StackOverflow. Find a topic that you love, subscribe to the appropriate tag for your topic, and start answering questions. This will force you to do research. And you will quickly find that you are an expert to several people.

Another way is to start a blog. This may be seen as a bit more difficult as there is some technical know how required to set up a blog – even a free one hosted somewhere. Also, this usually requires some creativity on your part to keep coming up with topics to write about. And some research for each thing you want to write about so that you sound enough like an expert for people to want to read what you say.

blog1But the key to either of these methods for becoming an expert is to do it with a regular cadence. Practice answering peoples questions. Or practice observing the world in ways that produce topics for you to write about. Ultimately both of these will force you to get better at doing what you do.

Another slightly more difficult thing to do is to write a small book. Pick a topic that is somewhat in your wheelhouse already.  Then learn enough about that topic to get a high level of understanding about the topic to piece together a table of contents that is three to four levels deep.

Then start researching each of those topics enough to form thoughts on each of the topics. Publish this book in real-time as you add content to it. Give the first few rounds away for free to get feedback quickly. Evolve over time. The key here is that you will start as a new guy. And finish with a published book on the topic. And since you researched all the content in the book you are now an expert in two ways: 1) you likely know more than most because you went wide and deep on the topic and 2) you are now a published author which brings a certain level of professionalism.

The key here is pick something. Scratch a little more than the surface on your topic. Give back to the community. They will criticize you for your efforts. And you will learn by fire. And eventually pop out the other side as an expert in some circles.

The secret here that nobody will ever tell you, but I will.  I have met a lot of industry experts. The only difference between them and you is that they did some work to get where they are. They actively chose to learn something vs. watching the latest TV series. They had a plan to be better than the next guy. And then they did it.

Follow through, commitment, dedication, stick to it and get shit done. In our world, this is the recipe to becoming expert enough in something.

Here is a whole site dedicated to being “Expert Enough”.  You will find a similar theme being mentioned there.

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How to Build Your Brand As a Programmer

I am always fascinated by people give me a funny face when I ask them what their personal brand is. I know I had a funny face when someone first asked me that during an interview once. But ever since then I totally got it and now promote the idea daily.

Everyone in our industry know’s who at least one of these guys are: Linus Torvalds, Scott Hanselman, Uncle Bob Martin, or Martin Fowler (If you don’t know any of them, pick one and go research their contribution to our world immediately!). They have a big marketing engine behind them simply because they have contributed to our industry in great ways. They are natural givers.

Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success

I just finished reading the book Give and Take by Adam Grant. I highly suggest that you read this book at some point. It will change the way you view the world. And likely make you more successful in your day to day interactions with people.

It describes differences between givers, matchers, and takers. And tells you why one personality type is more successful than another. An example of this – who do you think is the least successful at work? Givers! They give too much of their own time and can’t deliver on their own tasks. Who do you think is the most successful at work? Givers again! Because they give selflessly of their time, they are more likely to get the troops moving in the right direction.

– Andy

But you and I don’t have the same big engine behind us – because we haven’t yet contributed in the same mammoth way to our industry.  We will talk about how to level up our game in a mammoth way in other posts: time management, passion, willingness to give to others, etc.  But in this post we need to look at how to get you on the path to being at least somewhat known by the people that matter most to you.

Manage your resume on LinkedIn

We all know that we need a resume. How else will I get a job. But gone are the days where I need a resume, and a “profile” on one of a hundred job sites. It would seem that these days I can have a resume built on LinkedIn and send either a link to my LinkedIn profile, or a generated resume from LinkedIn. I prefer to use the LinkedIn labs resume builder.

Now all you need to do is add your history to LinkedIn. And remember to add your major accomplishments that you achieve at work in real time.  Otherwise you will end up with a resume that states where you worked and what your title is. There is no way you will remember every little awesome thing you did along the way between this job and that job. Especially if you are under pressure of getting the next job.

I prefer to add the books I have written, all the jobs I have worked at, along with some highlights for each job. It is ok to repeat certain things like whether you did ASP.NET MVC at every single job. That shows that you are likely good at that skill.

Also, curate the tag cloud of skills people say you are known for. This doesn’t have to all be technical skills. Soft skills at work are equally important. If you are known for being awesome – put that on there. Perhaps you are a great leader. Put that on there. Then organize the tags that you have to show the ones you align with most or most want to promote. You don’t have to let these tags auto sort.

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Create a personal website

People are going to search for you. It is inevitable. So make sure that they find your voice and not someone else’s. Now-a-days you can do this in less than 5 minutes. Go over to bluehost and pay $5 for monthly hosting. Then stand up a free WordPress site. Pick the theme that you are most happy with.

Now spend another 5 minutes putting your pitch together about who you are. Don’t just include work stuff. Tell your story. Who you really are. What your passions are. How many kids do you have? Give a brief overview of the person you think you really are. This is your first marketing event for yourself – so really sale your personal value.

If you intend to write a blog, do some content here.  Post articles that are a mix of personal and work related.  We can point other web properties here to start building a web.

When setting up your blog, begin to capture emails immediately using AWeber. While you may not immediately have much you can tell your readers other than blog posts, the time will come when you build an audience with your niche and want to share it directly with the people who you most resonate with. These are the people who will be your biggest fans, the ones who will be sharing your work everywhere, the ones who will buy your courses one day that teach them valuable skills they need.

Blog somewhere that already has traffic

While I suggested that you create a blog on your personal site, you don’t yet have a brand and therefore you don’t yet have any personal traffic. Unless you plan to spend a bunch of time self promoting via twitter, facebook, linkedin, etc. – you should get started somewhere that can actively help you self promote.

I started by putting my first blog on geekswithblogs.net.  At the time I started with them they had a few hundred bloggers there. All tech oriented. Any traffic they had – I immediately got. This was great. My posts hit their homepage and I got some readers on day one.

They now have well over 1000 bloggers on that site. This means that you get the traffic from some of their top bloggers. But with all that traffic you may get some noise. Also, your post won’t hang around on their home page for as long. But I still suggest starting there over many other places.

Put your code on GitHub

Do you write code? Then make sure some of your code can be seen by others. I would rather see that you write lots of code, for yourself, for others, for open source projects – than see 5 files that you made the most awesome effort known to man. We all get that your skill set is an ever growing and ever changing thing. What you post today may be the best you have now. And that will change over time. Don’t worry about it.

Put something out there. Get some feedback from people. It will help you grow over time.

Jeffrey Palermo told me once “If you were going to hire someone to juggle at your kids birthday party, wouldn’t you want to be sure they could juggle?” This was in response to someone stating that they felt above taking a coding test to get a job. People want to see that you can at least perform what you say you can perform.

Putting your code out there for others to look at gives people some confidence in you. The fact that you put your code out there for others to see also tells folks about your person. You are willing to take feedback and criticism.  You are willing to put yourself out there. This makes you more hirable over those that keep everything close and private.

The importance of helping others

You might be a matcher. You might be a taker. But when building a brand – neither of those traits are going to help sell you. You need to show that you can help others without expecting anything in return.

The easiest way to do this is by contributing on stackoverflow.  Build a profile there. Set up some searches to be sent to you as new questions are posted to topics you are interested in. Spend 5-10 minutes a day helping people solve their problems. Over time you build up some reputation for being a person that can help others.

Contribute to community sources of information

Whether this is a paid or unpaid activity – writing an article for a community site (like dotnetslackers) or for a magazine (like CODE) – is an awesome feather in your hat. Do this often. Again, this an effort to exchange your personal time giving to others for just a touch more polish on your online brand.  Try to do this once a month if this is the main avenue you like for industry exposure.

There are many ways you can contribute to your community. Writing isn’t the only way. I like to create slide decks of information that others can then use to present with. I like to also use my slide decks to present at user groups or conferences with. Presentations can be shared via SlideDeck or similar. And can then be hosted back on your LinkedIn profile.

The key is spend a little bit if your time, frequently, giving back to the community.

Single page sites about you

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There are so many sites out there that do this now.  But sites like about.me/andrewsiemer allow you to build a small snapshot of who you are. I like to include this link in my presentations or on a business card. This is an information radiator that can point to all the other endeavors you have accumulated over time.

I like to say where I am. What my phone number is (a google voice number). My rough home address. My current role. A brief summary of who I am. Then you can link in all of your blogs to be summarized on that page.

Now you have a single place to point to that can then point the viewers to so many other locations.

With all of this (we will write in more detail on this topic later) you can really start to control the search results people find when looking into who you are. Make sure you live by the rule “never say about someone what you wouldn’t say to someone”.  Remember that everything you put on the internet has a forever life. Don’t believe any systems that says “this is private”.  Assume everything you do on the internet is public always.

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Writing Resumes That Work

Writing a resume is not an easy thing. Putting one together can be nerve-racking and cause us to question ourselves at every step. Should I include all of my work history? Should I include a section on skill set? What shouldn’t I include? How long is too long. All of these question are valid and can be difficult to answer.

When I first put together my resume, a really long time ago, I really didn’t put too much effort into it. I simply spewed out all of my work experience on paper. I was fortunate that this was during the dot com boom and employers were hiring up just about anyone that was available.

In fact, a lot of times, the interviewers didn’t even get my resume until I gave it to them…DURING THE INTERVIEW. This meant that I had the opportunity to speak to them in person about my qualifications and overcome the obvious holes and lack of focus in my resume.

– Miguel

In my nearly 20 years as a professional, I’ve interviewed for dozens of jobs. I’ve also interviewed somewhere close to 150 people. That means that I’ve reading through several hundred resumes. As you might imagine, I’ve come across some doozies, but I have seen some really good ones as well.

My experience writing and reading through resumes has helped me come up with a few pointers for creating a resume that is engaging, informative and get results. Unlike others, I’m not going to throw statistics or cite scientific research on the subject. These guidelines are based on my experience and the observations I’ve made when interviewing myself and interviewing others.

Consider Your Objective

First of all, you should consider what the purpose of writing a resume is. This isn’t always the same. There are a lot of different reasons for putting together a resume and each one of them can affect how you write it and what you include.

A resume’s sole purpose is for selling myself to a potential employer, right? Well, sometimes…OK, most of the time.

You might be thinking that I am a little off my rocker right now. A resume’s sole purpose is for selling myself to a potential employer, right? Well, sometimes…OK, most of the time. There are a few other use cases though. Are you selling yourself to a particular employer? Are you targeting a industry? Maybe you’re focused on a particular role. Are you writing a general purpose resume that you will be submitting to multiple, different, positions? Or are you writing a resume to serve as proof that you’ve been there, done that?

All of these reasons for writing a resume can, and should, affect how you write it and what you decide to include in it. So before you begin, take a few minutes to consider what the intent for putting the resume together. This will be valuable information that will guide you as you flesh out the details

Tailor It To the Audience

In addition to knowing the purpose of the resume, you should also be cognizant of the resume’s audience. This should have some impact on how you write your resume, what you include in it and what you highlight (more on this later).

research-researchIn most cases, you’ll want to target the resume to the particular job that you are applying for. Whenever possible, you should include information about other places that you have worked where you had the same role, were in the same industry, developed a similar product or worked with the same type or size of data. All of these things will help create a connection with the reader and can potentially make you stand out from the rest of the candidates.

I know there have been several cases where I read someone’s resume and it made an immediate impact because that person had either worked on a similar product, with the same technologies, or in the same industry. Every time, it had a positive impact on whether I would consider this person further. This is exactly what you want. You want to make a connection with the reader and provided them with reasons to continue considering you as they whittle down the group of people that they are looking at for the job.

…research will help you target your resume to the employer and help it seem more relevant to the reader, the company and the position.

In a previous post, I wrote about how researching the potential employer is one of the keys to a good interview. Well, that also applies writing a resume. All of that research will help you target your resume to the employer and help it seem more relevant to the reader, the company and the position. With a little effort, you can make a HUGE impact on the effectiveness of your resume and help increase your chances of getting the job.

Include “Enough” Information

resume-bookThere is a lot of debate about how much information you should include in a resume. There are some people that will tell you to keep it short and others that will urge to write a book. I tend to lean towards the longer resume myself, with one caveat:

Make sure to highlight things that are important in a way that can be easily interpreted by the reader.

My current resume is around 8 pages long. Yeah, I know, that’s pretty long. I’m OK with that though. I would rather include more information than less. That being said, I try to highlight important things at the top of my resume and throughout my work history. I start off with a clear objective and follow it with a list of the programming languages, tools, and process that I have worked with. Then, for every position, I include a list of the programming languages, tools, and process that I used while I was there. This is at the top of each entry in my employment history and is highlighted so that I stands out visually.

I do all of these things to make my resumes easy to skim through while still providing some detail for every company that I have worked for. This way, the reader can easily get a feel for the diversity of my experience, the things that I have worked on recently and can still dig a little deeper into each of them if they want to get some more details.

Highlight Your Strengths

Your resume is your first opportunity to wow a potential employer. You have a small window of opportunity to make an impact and stand out from the rest of the pack. Remember, the person reading your resume will probably be reading a ton of resumes all at once. You need to make sure that yours makes some sort of connection.

One way to do this is to really highlight your strengths. If you’ve been doing this for a while, you’ve probably identified what it is you are really good at. Your previous companies, managers, and peers have recognized you for being good at a handful of things. Showcase these things you’re awesome at in your resume. Make sure to sprinkle it thoughtout your work history, skill sets, and other sections of your resume.

If you’re awesome at something and everywhere you’ve been everyone has told you that you are, then let your potential employer in on the secret.

For example, if you’ve been told that you are great at leading teams of developers, you should include examples of how you’ve done that at your previous positions. If you’ve been told that you’re technically awesome, then make sure to highlight all of the languages, tools and processes that you’ve worked with.

If you’re awesome at something and everywhere you’ve been everyone has told you that you are, then let your potential employer in on the secret. Just be careful not to come across as arrogant or cocky. Always employ the right amount of humility when bragging about your awesome-sauce. That being said, I’ve always argued that a resume is one of the only cases where you should try to sell yourself…and maybe even brag a little. Just tread lightly.

Always Be Truthful

resume-liarThis last pointer is super freaking easy to do and extremely important…never, ever, ever, ever lie or embellish in your resume. You should only ever include things that you are 100% sure of. A quick rule of thumb for writing your resume is…If there is any doubt, leave it out. You want to make sure that you can speak intelligently, and without hesitation, to anything that is in your resume.

A quick rule of thumb for writing your resume is…If there is any doubt, leave it out.

You should also not to take credit for other people’s work. It really isn’t worth it. Our community is a small and tightly connected one. The odds that someone at the potential employer will know someone else that you have worked with in the past are really high. Being called out for something that you’ve claimed to have done but didn’t really do can be a deal breaker for an employer. Don’t be that guy. Don’t take that chance. Don’t do it.

You should also be careful about calling yourself an expert on anything. I’ve always been super sensitive to this issue. I never call myself an expert on anything…ever. You should leave that for others to judge. I know that the times I’ve come across resumes where the candidate calls themselves an expert on something I’ve always gone away questioning there sincerity and/or cockiness. It just leaves a bad taste in my mouth so I avoid it and I would suggest that you do as well.

The key takeaway from all of this is that you should really pay close attention to how you write your resume and what you include in it. I know it can be a little stressful, but if you follow the four guidelines that I’ve described here you’ll be off to a great start. Remember, a resume is a living document. You should expect to tweak it as you go. In addition to adding new skills and work experience, you’ll find things that work well and other that don’t and want to adjust your resume accordingly. Treat it as your personal billboard. You have a short amount of time and will be one of many so make it count, make it relevant and make an impact.

Need Professional Advice?

Still unsure about how to make your resume put your best foot forward?

For $300, the Developer Springboard team will review your resume, ask you questions, and suggest or make edits to ensure your resume is presenting you and your skills in the most compelling possible light.

Your resume can mean the difference between getting the first interview versus getting passed over. It can mean the difference between finding a job at an amazing company where you level up quickly versus stagnating at a company with poor culture and even poorer pay.

We programmers have a way of down-playing our strengths and not wanting to sound like we’re bragging. We will help you accurately communicate your accomplishments and skills without coming off arrogantly.

Let Andrew, Miguel, and Devin make your resume stand out from the crowd and make you look as good as you really are.

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