promotion

Advancement – It’s All Up To You

Recently I’ve been having a lot of conversations with my friends and coworkers about essentially the same thing: how does one get a better role at their company?

How does a junior become a senior level developer? How does a senior developer make the transition over to lead, principal or architect and beyond? Often, these questions are followed by “I’ve been at my company for a while and I still haven’t been promoted to a new position.”

Aha, we gotten down to the root of the problem.

You Must Initiate

In our industry, unlike many others, progress is not usually a formula based on tenure. We should not expect, or rely on, being promoted into a more senior role because of the amount of time we’ve been with a company. That is not to say that tenure doesn’t play a role in advancement, but it is not usually going to be the main factor in deciding whether you are promoted or not.

adv1Whenever I have these conversations, I like to immediately reset the context of the discussion by telling people that we need to stop relying on others to promote us.

In most cases, the only person that cares about the advancement of your career is you! Many employers claim to care about providing opportunities for advancement but usually it is more of a selling point to potential employees than a true desire to see people grow, advance and do better. In most case, upward movement that is initiated by the employer is motivated by some business need and not your personal growth. It is some strategic move intended to satisfy a business objective that benefits your employer more than it does you.

That is why we should not leave this in our employer’s hands. Unlike other fields, ours is one in which we have the opportunity to affect our advancement and growth in dramatic ways. All we have to do is realize that it is in our power to do so…and take the reins.

Grow Your Skillset

First and foremost, you should make sure that your skillset is up to par.

skil1If you intend to get ahead, and move into a new role, you need to start by increasing your worth to your employer. You will need to demonstrate that you have mastered your current responsibilities and have grown beyond the constraints of your current position. This means making sure that you are comfortable with all of the tool, technologies and processes that are used on your project.

Depending on your goals, this might also require that you stay abreast of industry trends and emerging technologies. If you want to move into an architect position, for example, you’ll need to become an authority on all things technology…not just the technologies and tools that you are currently using.

Grow In Maturity

In order to make the jump from your current role into one with more responsibilities, and potentially one that involves managing other developers or projects, you will need to demonstrate a level of maturity that is commensurate with that type of position.

What does this mean? Well, it turns out that developers are quite emotional people. You would think that we’d be very stoic and level-headed because of type of work that we do. This is just not the case.

mat1I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we are used to being treated as magicians and, to some extent, we let it go to our heads. Employers, friends and family have always told us that we are awesome and, at some point, start to believe the hype. When something happens that we don’t agree with, we tend to be very vocal and respond emotionally.

I’m not suggesting that we should just accept everything that we are told. I’m saying that we should not respond as emotionally to situations…especially if we’re looking to move into a position of authority or leadership. Instead, we should object when appropriate, provided data to back up our objections and, whenever possible, offer solutions or alternatives.

Grow In Leadership

Usually, getting promoted means taking on more of leadership role.

If you intend to move into a new position, with more responsibility, you should take every opportunity you have to demonstrate your leadership abilities. This will prove to your employers that you have the necessary chops to take on the extra responsibilities.

This could mean any number of this. It may be that you put in some extra hours during a time crunch. I could also mean that you start mentoring your teammates. Maybe you start volunteering to lead programming efforts or projects. Whatever the case may be, you should start looking for opportunities to showcase your ability to get things done, help your teammates and coordinate development efforts.

What’s Your Special Sauce?

Every one of us has something that makes us unique…our own “special sauce” that sets us apart from everyone else.

spe1Maybe it your ability to get things done. Maybe you work really well under pressure. You might be the type of person that works well with business folks and can translate business requirements into technical specifications. You should try to find whatever it is that you are good at and make every effort to showcase it.

Be careful not to take it too far and come across as bragging, but take every opportunity you have to exercise this special skill of yours and make sure everyone around you is aware of it. Whatever you can do to set yourself apart from the rest of the team, in a positive, way will help you stand out and increase the likelihood of promotion.

You Are In Charge

If you take anything away from this blog post, it should be the idea that you are in charge of your own career.

You, more than anyone, can affect it. If you want to make a move: do it! Whatever the “it” might be for the particular move you’re trying to make. Make it happen. Remember, you always have more option at your disposal; you can always find another job.

If the company you are with doesn’t look like it’s going to allow you to progress like you want, you can always go somewhere else. The only thing that can keep you from advancing is yourself and, luckily, that is under your control. Just do it!

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Keep Your Portfolio Up-to-Date At All Times

I have a never-expiring calendar reminder for myself to update my portfolio. Otherwise I just won’t do it.

Make Yourself Do It

 

But it is surprisingly hard to make yourself do it even with a calendar reminder constantly dinging you. And unfortunately you only ever realize that you needed to do it – and didn’t – when you need your resume to be up to date when you are ready (or worse: when you aren’t ready) to move to the next gig.

resu1This added pressure means that you are now going to be under the gun to send out your resume in a not quite up to date form, or you will struggle to remember all the cool new things you have done in the past many months.

It won’t be your best showing. You won’t likely have all the detail you once had. And ultimately you are doing a disservice to yourself when thinking about this late in the game.

Use LinkedIn As Your Source of Truth

A long time ago I stopped maintaining a resume in document form.

Before there was a LinkedIn it made sense to constantly toil over the formatting of my resume. And it made since to keep a copy and several backups.

I needed a consistent place to go to for the source of truth for my work history as there wasn’t one clear winner on the internet for such things.  Back then I would keep a digital resume on Monster and various other job boards. It was a real hassle to keep them all up to date.

But now a days it is easy to keep your information in LinkedIn. It is now my source of truth.

I try to go there at least once a month to enter at least one cool thing I did that month. It might be something simple like solving a customer’s problem. Or something more complex like learning a new thing in a pinch prior to a sales call or speaking engagement.

sour1Similar to blogging, if you don’t pay attention to the every day details of your day job you will miss the really important parts that you can use later to sell yourself.

Additionally you are missing the opportunity of someone looking for that special talent that you just picked up. You may make good money doing a bang-up job with that 80% thing you do. You run up against some new fancy way of doing things. And that becomes your new norm.

But you never update your resume.

As far as recruiters and other hiring managers know you are only really good at that 80% thing. There is no mention of your new go-to-favorite skill – which is what they really need right now and can’t find anywhere.

This is a missed opportunity for you in a couple of ways. The recruiter won’t contact you to let you know that your new skill is in high demand. Which means you miss out on the possibility of shifting to a new gig. Or, if you really like your job, but want to earn more, you might miss the opportunity to bargain around your newly found skill. Either way, this is your loss in the here and now.

So what sorts of things might you keep track of on LinkedIn? When you have a job, you can use LinkedIn as a running log of interesting facts. When you don’t have a job you can scour through your profile and clean out the things that aren’t really relevant any more. Let’s look at what sorts of things are hand to keep track of:

Title and Responsibility Changes

There are a couple ways of tracking when your title changes and when your responsibility changes. The first is the easiest and doesn’t require much thought. Keep one entry per company you work at. Update the title. List the existing responsibilities.

promo1This is a great way to keep a short resume. And it is a great way to not tell your hiring manager about your history. This is where the difference between a traditional resume and a CV/Portfolio come in. When I am in the hiring manager role I like to see where a person has been and all the things at a high level they have done while at a company.

If you were a developer, then a team lead, then the architect, then the engineering director – list those out. They are very different jobs. They will have very different responsibilities. And being able to show that you have done them all is important to many hiring managers. It shows you are experienced.

We have interns at my current company. One of which we have had back three separate times. For a person like this it is very important to distinctly show that you came back at three different times. And detail out what you did on each occasion. This paints a different picture than someone who just worked somewhere with no timeline. It doesn’t show that we liked you so much that we kept hiring your back.

Business Goals Achieved

Business people, hiring managers, etc. – they don’t generally care that you learned the latest version of HTML. What they do care is that because of your mastery of this new version of HTML you were able to up the sales conversion of your check out process because more customers are able to complete the check out process on their phone and tablets.

roi1Geeks really care that you were able to write a mail sending tool in 100 lines of unreadable code. But business folks care that your tool took into account the bounce rate of certain domains and the rules around how you stay off of black lists so that your email penetration goes up 30% which effectively increased their over all penetration resulting in X number of new dollars for the month.

Now, don’t get me wrong. You need to swizzle this in a manner that you salt and pepper your business swizzle with some tech babble so that all audiences are made happy. If you just deliver the business numbers uber geeks may find your resume wanting. Add appropriate tech talk to sell that you know what you are talking about.

Use the Right Voice to Tell the Right Story

Equally important to what you did is how you tell the story. It is very off-putting to read about a guy that is singing the me-me-me-me-me-me-meeeee song! It is ok for you to say “I used tech X to achieve business Y” now and then. But equally important is how you enabled the team to achieve a goal. Or how you pulled bugs for a week to get to zero defects (sacrificed your enjoyment for the team). Tell a story of being a valuable team member.

If you are in a leadership role tell the story of how you are a shit-umbrella vs. a shit-funnel.  Give concrete examples of how you help you team get stuff done.

Bottom line: keep your portfolio up-to-date at all times. And LinkedIn is a great place to use for it.

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